innovation

Think of your favorite song of the moment. How does it make you feel; does it change your mood? Maybe the way your feeling impacts your “favorite” song right now. Both, actually.

Music is powerful. It has the influence to change our emotions, but it also has the capability to help us express ever-changing feelings. Music therapy for cancer patients is an evidence-based care strategy to reduce anxiety and even help improve pain management. Yet, it is often missing from oncology services. In ten years of oncology nursing, I have never had the opportunity to work in a clinic setting with music therapy services. I haven’t had the chance to actually see the difference music therapy can make for patients; that means literally thousands of patients haven’t had that service offered to them alongside their clinical care. That’s incredibly disappointing.

I want the chance to change that for the patients I currently help serve.

Will you please take literally two minutes to vote for my cancer center to receive the Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program via funding from LIVESTRONG? Voting ends Friday, April 11th, at 5 PM Eastern. Vote once and then follow the corresponding links to share via Facebook as well as Twitter to garner a total of 3 votes to help bring this amazing program.

With three days remaining to vote, I’d love your help to improve lives.

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Since its formal inception in 2002, the Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program has become an essential component of the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, a subsidiary of Morristown Medical Center’s integrative approach to caring for cancer patients. The Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program, one of the longest-running programs of its kind in the country, has demonstrated great success in serving the people of the communities where the program is currently offered. The program’s overarching goal is to facilitate relaxation, decrease anxiety and stress, enhance wellness, improve pain management and provide comfort and support for cancer patients and their caregivers.

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Dangerous Day-Dreaming People

by Nursetopia on February 10, 2014

DangerousPeople

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In Dire Need of Creative Extremists

by Nursetopia on January 20, 2014

MLK_CreativeExtremists_Nursetopia

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How many times have I preached my sermon about the innovation of nurses and how we’re the best innovators in the world? Many, many times. Because. It’s. True.

Nurses are constantly working around broken, inefficient processes and systems. We come up with some ingenious ideas which sound a lot like, “You know what we need to fix this is…” and “Someone should really make this thing look like this [doodles on scrap paper]…” and “What if we had…”

MakerNurseNurses’ minds are incredible, and now MakerNurse wants to highlight that fabulous ingenuity by “uncovering and collecting stories from inventive nurses. By examining nurse innovation in U.S. hospitals, MakerNurse hopes to uncover the behaviors, circumstances and technological drivers that enhance resourcefulness and innovation among hospital nurses, and identify tools and resources that could help more nurses bring their ideas to fruition and lead improvements in patient care.” MIT’s Little Devices Lab is propelling MakerNurse forward with support by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

All nurses are invited to participate and share in the conversation. Help spur our profession’s creativity. Sign up for updates and future communications. Share your story of daily workarounds and your solutions to resolve those. MakerNurses unite!

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MashupHere’s a smidgen of the goodness I’ve been reading and watching this week:

What are you filling your brain with currently?

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Here’s a snippet of what I’ve been reading (and even watching) lately.

What about you? What are you reading this week?

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So a smidgen of my reading for the week included:

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Here’s a snippet of my reading for the last two weeks as I took a writing break over Spring Break.

Whew! What are you reading these days?

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JPU-PWRSTION-2_Front_3QTRSleek design. Vibrant color. Incredible power. Mmmmmm. The mophie juice pack powerstation® has it all. The 4000 mAh external battery, available in black or red, is compatible with most smartphones and tablets, and it can charge just about any mobile device four times faster than traditional USB batteries.

Like 71% of U.S. nurses and 66% of nursing students, I use my iPhone constantly at work. Whether it’s a clinical app, email correspondence, or even managing my time – my smartphone is a necessary nursing tool. That also means I’m often left sweating my battery life near the end of my work day. I hate that feeling – knowing work remains and realizing I may not have the tools to complete it efficiently. With the spring and fall conference season, I am typically tethered to an outlet in order to tweet conference happenings or try to squeeze in work during every break. And, even when I’m not working, my iPhone and iPad are everyday entertainment for both me and the rest of my family – including three kiddos under the age of eight. Seriously, my three-year old can devour an iPad battery.

JPU-PWRSTION-2_3QTR-PortsI am quite glad the mophie juice pack powerstation® is part of my professional and personal life now. I was hooked as I soon as I pulled it from the packaging. It’s four LED indicator lights mesmerized me, the ruby red soft-touch finish exterior spoiled me, and the mophie juice pack powerstation® made me giddy just watching it charge my smartphone away from any outlet. Tucking it away in my briefcase or backpack was a no brainer as the mophie juice pack powerstation® is just a little bigger than an iPhone; you better believe this sweet little gem will join me on every business and personal trip. My entire family already knows how to use it. Just like with my iPhone, I have no clue how I ever functioned without the mophie juice pack powerstation®.

Oh, yes, it is that good. It is a must-have tool in your nursing practice and resource toolkit.

 

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I’m always doing a lot of formal research reading, but here’s a sample of my more informal reading this week.

What are you reading?

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