leadership

Just Ask: Getting Over the ‘No’

by Nursetopia on July 18, 2015

She Could Say NoThere once was a time in my life that I would assume some of my ideas or requests would automatically be squelched with a “no” answer. My assumption would actually limit me from even asking or discussing the request or idea. One thing is for sure -the answer will always be “no” to something that’s not asked.

I had to get over the fear of “no.” In light of many other things in work and care, being told no is not really that big of a deal, but when you’re told no over and over again, you can start to think your ideas are rubbish and simply stop generating ideas altogether. That’s not good for any organization.

“No” for the sake of “no” has never really set well with me; I have always wanted to know the why behind the answer. Most people are this way, which is why leadership communication is important to validate ideas and questions. Just because the answer is no doesn’t mean the idea or request wasn’t valuable. I’ve learned that both when I’m told no with an explanation or I do the same thing with those who follow me, often times a subsequent idea results to overcome the explanation’s barrier. It’s a beautiful thing – respectful, transparent communication.

Receiving a “no” answer is really no big deal, but it does take practice – just like everything else – to maintain professionalism and competency within the situation. “No” comes in all forms, but it mostly signifies the opportunity to grow – to research more, collect additional data, strengthen a business case. It’s a stepping stone rather than a stumbling block.

Get over your fear of “no.” Just ask.

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Doing Right by People

by Nursetopia on January 12, 2015

Nothing replaces the feeling of knowing you’ve done the “right thing” for people. No matter who knows or doesn’t know, it’s a reward like none other.

I am shocked at the number of people who think others don’t, can’t, or won’t do the right thing  in work and/or life.

Do right by people. They’ll do right by you. Even if they don’t, keep doing right by people.

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Murphy’s Laws of Nursing Leadership & Management

by Nursetopia on October 16, 2014

Oye VeyHeard the phrase “anything that can go wrong, will go wrong”? Yep, Murphy’s Law is prevalent in nursing leadership and management just as it is in other areas of nursing and health care. Here are a few gold-standard Murphy’s Laws for nurse managers and leaders.

1. The day you’ve set aside and diligently blocked from meetings will be the day a stomach virus sweeps through the unit, causing severe short-staffing to the point of needing your clinical assistance for direct patient care. Good job blocking that calendar, and best wishes for “catching up!”

2. Your boss is guaranteed to call you on the one day you leave the office early. And he’ll need some numbers for a report within the hour.

3. The “Can-I-Have-5-Minutes?” conversation will take over your next scheduled meeting – that you lead – and end up with at least three action items to complete.

4. A patient will request to speak with you right as you realize you have yet to empty your bladder during the day.

5. The moment you are fully staffed, at least two team members indicate they need leaves of absence.

6. The probability of Joint Commission showing up for your organization’s unannounced survey increases with the number of days remaining until you leave for your long-awaited vacation.

7. The week after you ask team members to purge storage closets will be the one week of the decade in which something from that storage closet will be requested.

8. Minutes before your budget is due you will remember an ancillary expense that could potentially lead to a major variance.

9. The copy machine will jam and run out of toner as you try to print your presentation for the multidisciplinary board.

10. The candidate you love for the open position will be screened out of the HR system via a glitch, leading to weeks of attempted correction.

Creating these just makes me laugh. Leadership is a trip. In so many great ways.

What other Murphy’s Laws do you have in nursing leadership and management?

 

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NursetopiaMashupCroppedJust like I do with hardcopy journals and books, I tend to save up articles in my email box until I get time to binge-read. Here’s some of what I’ve been reading that I’ve saved for a while. There’s some pretty good stuff here!

Do you save articles and tweets in your email inbox, too? What’s piling up in there?

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If You Have to Give Up Something, Give Up Strategy

by Nursetopia on October 1, 2014

Be Without Strategy

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Mess with a Good Thing

by Nursetopia on August 28, 2014

Why mess with a good thing?

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. 

Our system works. 

But can it be better? When is the last time any part of the system has been improved? Does it function optimally for everyone involved – a win-win? Are you thinking about potential disruptors? Do you have the market disruption to propel everyone forward?

There is always room for improvement. Always.

Mess with a good thing.

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An Unstoppable Reminder

by Nursetopia on August 26, 2014

Unstoppable

Thanks to Beau Taplin for such words.

There’s value in continuing despite yourself. Get out of your own way. Move the work you touch. Gather your failures and doubts into a big pile, and step over them.

Be unstoppable.

 

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Clinical Nurse Leaders, or CNLs, are becoming more and more prevalent within the nursing profession. Rightly so; these colleagues are making waves in the industry, saving lives and money. Here’s a little more about Clinical Nurse Leaders: The Air Traffic Controllers of Patient Care.

 

USF-MSN_ClinicalNurseLeaderInfographic

Disclosure: This article is sponsored by University of San Francisco Online Master of Science in Nursing

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NursetopiaMashupCroppedI’m forever saving articles, hoarding items in my RSS feed, favoring tweets, and emailing myself with items to look up. I’m never short of reading material, and many times I am overloaded with information that is just collecting electronic dust. This week I cleaned out my inbox and other online warehouses. Here’s some of the eclectic information I reviewed recently:

Am I the only one that does this? Surely not. What great reading is lurking in the electronic piles you keep?

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HelloImFreshMeatRNHigh fives. Handwritten notes with excited scribbles. Eyes that smile. Exhalation of “We’re so glad you’re here. We’ve been wanting to work with you!” Emails from providers joining in arrival chorus. Starbucks on the last day of your first week (e.g. “You made it, and you did great!”). Special access to team-member-only inside jokes. Oodles of system-branded gifts because, “Well, you’re one of us, now.” A planned orientation that screams, “We’ve been expecting you for a while, and we’ve got you covered.” Expectations singing clarity and professional growth. Already-set check-in meetings to let you know you’ll be supported throughout your orientation (and beyond), providing reassurance in all the newness. Leaders who have recurring service anniversaries already on their calendars before leaving day one. Sincerity and invitation rather than exhaustion and exasperation.

What if we welcomed new nurses, physicians, medical lab technicians, and all other health care colleagues to the profession, to our units, to our health care systems in this way?

How do you welcome new team members?

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