Nursing

Clinical Nurse Leaders, or CNLs, are becoming more and more prevalent within the nursing profession. Rightly so; these colleagues are making waves in the industry, saving lives and money. Here’s a little more about Clinical Nurse Leaders: The Air Traffic Controllers of Patient Care.

 

USF-MSN_ClinicalNurseLeaderInfographic

Disclosure: This article is sponsored by University of San Francisco Online Master of Science in Nursing

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Educator SuperheroShe saved you with just-in-time teaching on that new drain. He swept in and made sure you knew all about the changes in the blood administration policy. She stayed right by your side, ever-so-secretly encouraging you during your first time through the new procedure technique. He printed the evidence synopsis for your practice question and helped roll out the team education so everyone else could see the evidence (and gap) in order to improve patient care.

These people are one-in-the-same. They are Educator Superheroes, and they save the day all. the. time. What better way to say ‘thank you’ than to nominate your Educator Superhero for Mosby’s fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing Educator category?

The fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing contest seeks to recognize excellence in the nursing industry as a reflection of the type of excellence that Mosby’s Nursing Suite products instill in nurses. Anyone and everyone is invited to nominate nurses who excel at certain aspects of their jobs – patient care, education, standards and regulations, time management and technology innovation. Each of these core qualities are tied to superhero roles, and the categories for the winners – the Protector, Educator, the Informer and the Validator.

The Educator category is currently open for nominations. It closes on July 15th, so nominate your Superhero today!

Nominations are accepted at ElsevierHeroes.com and Mosby’s Suite Facebook page. The four winners will be announced via Facebook in September. The winners will also be honored at the ANCC National Magnet Conference® October 8-10, 2014 in Dallas, Texas.

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NursetopiaMashupCroppedI’m forever saving articles, hoarding items in my RSS feed, favoring tweets, and emailing myself with items to look up. I’m never short of reading material, and many times I am overloaded with information that is just collecting electronic dust. This week I cleaned out my inbox and other online warehouses. Here’s some of the eclectic information I reviewed recently:

Am I the only one that does this? Surely not. What great reading is lurking in the electronic piles you keep?

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She rescued you by prepping weekly Joint Commission audits for you. He saved they day and knew exactly what you needed to meet OSHA requirements. She quoted CPT codes and regulations for nursing visits faster than you could say “revenue cycle.” He had every bit of the medication reconciliation policy researched and documented for the practice council meeting. She explained the clinical practice guidelines behind the new procedure technique.

TheValidatorThese people are one-in-the-same. They are Nurse Validator Superheroes, and they save the day all. the. time. They look like rule-followers, and yes, yes they are that (and thank heavens for that!), but they are so, so, so, soooo much more! They are the ones we run to when we need to know what to do and how to do it from a real person – a professional who proves himself or herself on dotting those i’s and crossing all the t’s. And our healthcare system and patient care is all the better because of their awesomeness. What better way to say ‘thank you’ than to nominate your Validator Superhero for Mosby’s fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing Educator category?

The fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing contest seeks to recognize excellence in the nursing industry as a reflection of the type of excellence that Mosby’s Nursing Suite products instill in nurses. Anyone and everyone is invited to nominate nurses who excel at certain aspects of their jobs – patient care, education, standards and regulations, time management and technology innovation. Each of these core qualities are tied to superhero roles, and the categories for the winners – the Protector, Educator, the Informer and the Validator.

The Validator category is currently open for nominations. It closes on June 15th, so nominate your Superhero today!

Nominations are accepted at ElsevierHeroes.com and Mosby’s Suite Facebook page. The four winners will be announced via Facebook in September. The winners will also be honored at the ANCC National Magnet Conference® October 8-10, 2014 in Dallas, Texas.

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Here’s to Nurses [video]

by Nursetopia on May 30, 2014

Elsevier originally created the Here’s to Nurses video to celebrate Nurses Week 2014. Bright and full of crazy stats only nurses won’t find astonishing – I love this video. So even though Nurses Week has come and gone, it’s still a great time to honor the nurses in your life.

Here’s to nurses!!

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Here’s to Nurses [video]

by Nursetopia on May 30, 2014

Elsevier originally created the Here’s to Nurses video to celebrate Nurses Week 2014. Bright and full of crazy stats only nurses won’t find astonishing – I love this video. So even though Nurses Week has come and gone, it’s still a great time to honor the nurses in your life.

Here’s to nurses!!

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Oh my goodness. I am so glad one of my friends shared the Tumblr #WhatShouldWeCallNursing with me. I know Nurses Week is supposed to be all wonderful and full of appreciation – and believe me – it was, but I am pretty sure the universe conspired against me last week saying, “Yeah, I know you’ve been a nurse for a while and particularly love this week. Let’s see how you handle this; tell me now if you still love nursing. Mwuuuaaaaahhhhhaaaahaaaaaa!” At least that’s how it felt. Seriously…tough week.

So, when my friend shared #WhatShouldWeCallNursing, I cried from laughter (and thankfully not due to my week…although that would absolutely come later in the week, unfortunately). I’ve been back to the Tumblr I don’t know how many times, and I end up laughing out loud among people who just stare at me.

I don’t care. It’s that funny. Check it out. 

Thanks to the awesome, anonymous nurse who continues to take suggestions from the nursing community for ongoing posts. I love it so much, I included a few gif’s that pertain to my nursing world…

When a meeting gets cancelled just minutes before it starts:

When people ask me if I sit at a desk all day as a nurse director:

When my staffing works out:

When my new positions are approved for hiring:

When someone says they didn’t receive any information sent out multiple times over the course of six weeks regarding the mandatory training due in one day.

Have a great week!

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Happy Birthday, Florence!

by Nursetopia on May 12, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 7.05.18 PMToday marks the 194th birthday of Florence Nightingale, the “Mother of Modern Nursing,” the “Lady with the Lamp.” Today also signifies International Nurses Day and the final day of Nurses Week.

A hero of the Crimean War, Nightingale left a legacy as far-reaching as statistics, feminism, sanitation, and literature.

Happy birthday, Florence!

Happy International Nurses Day!

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Not So Random Thoughts on Nursing

by Nursetopia on May 6, 2014

Leadership is a tremendous privilege offering a unique perspective. During a critical moment this week, the seconds felt like warp speed, and yet it also felt like some of the longest minutes of my year, sludging across time. In that moment, I was never more proud of the multidisciplinary healthcare team and never more keenly aware of the safety and care nurses routinely provide for patients and visitors.

Nurses are continuously beside people otherwise known as strangers. We give our days, nights, weekends, and holidays to anticipate and remove issues before they even happen. And when the random, unthinkable (to some) occurs, we do anything and everything in our power to protect the lives entrusted to us. Our expertise is highly under-recognized yet always expected.

Nursing care is anything but random. Even when unplanned, it’s systematic. Because nursing is a profession, complete with a code of ethics and a vast, growing body of knowledge. Florence Nightingale called it a “noble profession.”

She may have been on to something.

Happy Nurses Week to all those who provide order to the random and make the routine look easy. I and the rest of the world celebrate you!

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What ‘Community’ Looks Like in Health Care

by Nursetopia on April 17, 2014

Each hospital has its own culture – a mixture of the city, the people, artistic and political movements, and area businesses. Even hospitals within the same city have different cultures thanks to the leaders within those organizations and their backgrounds and viewpoints. Academic hospitals feel different than community hospitals. Organizational behavior is fascinating, especially in health care.

There are around 400 major teaching hospitals in the U.S. So, with 5,723 total hospitals nationwide, that means most people are likely to receive care in a community hospital rather than an academic center. Yet, “community hospital” often has a negative connotation among many, as if there is some teaching-hospital snobbery that only those facilities are worthy to provide care. Sure, major teaching hospitals are centers of massive research and up-to-date science. However, community hospitals deliver exceptional care throughout the nation and are doing some wildly innovative things that large teaching institutions could never do as a result of their bureaucratic red tape and flaming hoops of often unnecessary-and-frustrating process.

Don’t get me wrong; I love major teaching centers. They are brilliant beacons of light in our national healthcare system. All-in-all, though, community hospitals have my heart. The community sometimes get lost, but when community culture meets community health care, amazing things happen.

You see, community  is something we assess in healthcare all the time. Nurses continuously document mothers’ bonding with their newborns and family members and friends at patients’ bedsides. We notice eye contact or lack thereof and chart about affect and social assessment questions to protect patients from themselves or others. We have entire teams of professionals to help patients when they feel all alone, so we can help them belong and be productive members of society. Relationships are part of health and well-being; there’s no way around that. Community is relationship. Community hospitals aren’t made up of strangers. No, the great ones are filled with relationships; and I’m not just talking about doctor-nurse or supervisor-subordinate relationships. I’m talking about our-kids-play-basketball-together relationships and yeah-my-doctor-is-my-neighbor relationships and I-knew-that-physical-therapist-when-she-was-yea-high relationships and that-small-business-owner-helped-build-our-new-clinic relationships. It’s an incredible sense of belonging that promotes health care. 

What a concept.

Have we lost too much of the community - the relationship-building and maintaining – that’s possibly assisting in the erosion of health care?

"Relationships" by Nic Price via Flickr.com “Relationships” by Nic Price via Flickr.com

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