Posted on

Stop and Honor Your Informer Nurse Superhero

TheInformerShe pulled two siloed departments together to develop efficiencies for patients and the healthcare system. He saw an opportunity to standardize items across providers, reducing inventory and saving finances. She knows there’s a better way to complete that process, and she reaches out to colleagues to hear how others are winning in care. He is the go-to electronic medical record user and can develop any report to make your audit sing in record time. She has a completely different use for social media – one that makes executives want to unblock sites just to see what happens when she starts talking about health care.

These people are one-in-the-same. They are Informer Superheroes, and they save the day all. the. time. What better way to say ‘thank you’ than to nominate your Informer Superhero for Mosby’s fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing Informer category?

The fourth annual Superheroes of Nursing contest seeks to recognize excellence in the nursing industry as a reflection of the type of excellence that Mosby’s Nursing Suite products instill in nurses. Anyone and everyone is invited to nominate nurses who excel at certain aspects of their jobs – patient care, education, standards and regulations, time management and technology innovation. Each of these core qualities are tied to superhero roles, and the categories for the winners – the Protector, Educator, the Informer and the Validator.

The Informer category is currently open for nominations. It closes on August 15th, so nominate your Superhero today!

Nominations are accepted at ElsevierHeroes.com and Mosby’s Suite Facebook page. The four winners will be announced via Facebook in September. The winners will also be honored at the ANCC National Magnet Conference® October 8-10, 2014 in Dallas, Texas.

Posted on

Everything I Know About Lean I Learned in First Grade [Book Review]

photo-27I spent the majority of last week at a training about lean tools and concepts. At the beginning of the class, the instructor asked how many people volunteered for the class as opposed to how many were “voluntold” to attend the class. I was definitely a volunteer for the class, seeking it out to learn more about my organization’s use of these lean concepts, and I thoroughly enjoyed the class.

I had an entire class on operational efficiencies in graduate school, but it wasn’t tailored to health care, and there were few examples that I could extrapolate at the time as most of my colleagues were heavily focused on mechanical industries. I have always been drawn to systems and processes, though, and I now see more of that graduate class influenced my current work than I previously realized. After the lean class, I now have very clear examples of lean work in health care, formalized and workable tools, and terms to go along with current work. I nerded out the entire time; it was a blast.

After the course, I borrowed Everything I Know About Lean I Learned in the First Grade, written by Robert O. Martichenko, from the instructing department’s lending library. It caught my eye simply because it looked like an easy and intriguing read. And it definitely is.

Even after 28 hours of lean training, the book delivered easy to understand concepts and examples to further bolster my lean learning. It was fun to see lean principles at work in an elementary school, and I know I will think about many of the examples as I walk through my children’s school in the future. Complete with illustrations, brief paragraphs, and summary sections, the book is an easy two-hour read that will get you thinking about lean principles everywhere in business, no matter the industry.

Two complexly simple themes throughout the book are:

  • Lean is not about tools; lean is about thinking. 
  • ‘Why’ is more important than ‘how.’ 

I am going to keep chewing on these and keep them at the forefront of my mind. Overall, this is a quick and thought-provoking read. You should check it out.

Posted on

From No Safe Amount of Alcohol to Prescribing Music when Meds Fail: A Nursetopia Reading & Education Mashup [Part 24]

NursetopiaMashupCroppedHere’s a smidgen of what I filled my brain with over the long weekend…

…What about you?

Posted on

Administering A Dose of Gratitude

It’s easy to point out the wrong in health care. It’s all around us. Despite the brokeness, there are dozens hundreds of processes and moments that do work well.

Praise is limited for the on-time surgery with appropriate and accurate “time-outs;” reconciled instrument counts; providers utilizing the just-in-time stocked supplies that took months to pare down without impacting patient outcomes and negotiating sustainable contracts; post-operative nurses who self-scheduled to improve their own satisfaction while curbing rising staffing costs; pharmacy technicians who verify drug counts remain consistent from shift to shift and unit to unit; health information management teams who adequately code and bill for procedures as they weed through  hundreds of thousands of data points; lab team members that quickly, efficiently, and safely process pathology specimens as dozens of  additional patient body fluids and tissues whiz through the system; leaders who make time for people despite the tug of tasks; and on and on.

q4PRN

 

Everyday health care has its awful moments. In no way am I trying to minimize healthcare errors; they’re catastrophic – even fatal – in our industry. Yet, for every one of those you-didn’t-do-this-right notifications, there are myriad more wow-that-worked-awesomely instances.

 

 

Gratitude is potent no matter the route. What’s important is that it’s actually administered.