social media

This week, Baylor Scott & White Health live-tweeted a heart transplant via #HeartTXLive. The Twitter stream follows the story of “Jane,” a North Texas mom in her 30’s, living with cardiomyopathy since birth who found out Monday morning a donor match was found. By Monday evening, the entire country heard Jane’s story and watched as she received the gift of life through organ donation. Social media buzzed, and traditional news outlets began sharing the event, as well.

HeartTXLive

I was glued to the feed, and going back through #HeartTXlive again is just as enthralling and inspirational. Not only did Baylor Scott & White Health honor an organ donor and family giving such a precious gift, but they gave Jane a new chance at life while highlighting a complex surgery, team, and process. They pulled back the curtain on transplant surgery and showed the world what incredible care happens everyday without millions of people in concert. Individuals from all over social media chimed in with #ImADonor, and Texas organ donation organizations saw a 30% increase in residents registering as donors.

Those aren’t numbers. A 30% increase in registered organ donors means hundreds of people in need have greater chances of having a match. That’s the gift of life. And it all came from one person who registered as an organ donor and a family who chose to give through their grief. What a legacy.

Thank you to Jane and her family – for their courage in sharing their story in such a vulnerable moment; to Baylor Scott & White Health – for forward-thinking and using social media as a powerful, altruistic tool; and to Jane’s donor/donor family and organ donors and families everywhere – for giving life.

If you’re not an organ donor and want to give life to others, register with your state and let your family know your wishes.

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Go Mo-Mo-Movember Pinterest Board

by Nursetopia on October 22, 2014

Movember Pinterest BoardIn one way or another, I am always raising awareness of cancer. As much as I love my job as an oncology nurse leader, I would love for there to be no need for my services.

Events are popping up left and right these days, and while it’s tough work, it is personally satisfying to create something from nothing with great people to raise awareness of site-specific cancers and help screen community members for various cancers that can be detected early per national, evidence-based screening guidelines. I always refresh my memory as I prepare for cancer awareness talks or events, and it seems I always, always, always learn something new.

November, or Movember, as it is now well-known, is quickly approaching. I’m working on a few things in my area, and before I start, I always like to brainstorm – with people and by myself, with tools (such as the Internet) or with only my big-dreaming brain. Part of my recent brainstorming for Movember developed into a Movember/Mustache Mania Pinterest board. I’m simply sharing with you, as well, because it is far too easy to get sucked into Pinterest!

Do you or does your health care system do anything for Movember or to increase the awareness of men’s cancers? I want to know; I’m still looking for ideas!

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NursetopiaMashupCroppedJust like I do with hardcopy journals and books, I tend to save up articles in my email box until I get time to binge-read. Here’s some of what I’ve been reading that I’ve saved for a while. There’s some pretty good stuff here!

Do you save articles and tweets in your email inbox, too? What’s piling up in there?

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Oh my goodness. I am so glad one of my friends shared the Tumblr #WhatShouldWeCallNursing with me. I know Nurses Week is supposed to be all wonderful and full of appreciation – and believe me – it was, but I am pretty sure the universe conspired against me last week saying, “Yeah, I know you’ve been a nurse for a while and particularly love this week. Let’s see how you handle this; tell me now if you still love nursing. Mwuuuaaaaahhhhhaaaahaaaaaa!” At least that’s how it felt. Seriously…tough week.

So, when my friend shared #WhatShouldWeCallNursing, I cried from laughter (and thankfully not due to my week…although that would absolutely come later in the week, unfortunately). I’ve been back to the Tumblr I don’t know how many times, and I end up laughing out loud among people who just stare at me.

I don’t care. It’s that funny. Check it out. 

Thanks to the awesome, anonymous nurse who continues to take suggestions from the nursing community for ongoing posts. I love it so much, I included a few gif’s that pertain to my nursing world…

When a meeting gets cancelled just minutes before it starts:

When people ask me if I sit at a desk all day as a nurse director:

When my staffing works out:

When my new positions are approved for hiring:

When someone says they didn’t receive any information sent out multiple times over the course of six weeks regarding the mandatory training due in one day.

Have a great week!

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MashupMy reading list is filling back up again, and I’m absolutely loving it. I’m squeezing in chapters here and there, and you better believe free moments in between meetings and snippets of downtime have their fair share of bit-sized information and education. Here’s a little of what’s been passing through my brain lately:

What are you reading these days?

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Think of your favorite song of the moment. How does it make you feel; does it change your mood? Maybe the way your feeling impacts your “favorite” song right now. Both, actually.

Music is powerful. It has the influence to change our emotions, but it also has the capability to help us express ever-changing feelings. Music therapy for cancer patients is an evidence-based care strategy to reduce anxiety and even help improve pain management. Yet, it is often missing from oncology services. In ten years of oncology nursing, I have never had the opportunity to work in a clinic setting with music therapy services. I haven’t had the chance to actually see the difference music therapy can make for patients; that means literally thousands of patients haven’t had that service offered to them alongside their clinical care. That’s incredibly disappointing.

I want the chance to change that for the patients I currently help serve.

Will you please take literally two minutes to vote for my cancer center to receive the Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program via funding from LIVESTRONG? Voting ends Friday, April 11th, at 5 PM Eastern. Vote once and then follow the corresponding links to share via Facebook as well as Twitter to garner a total of 3 votes to help bring this amazing program.

With three days remaining to vote, I’d love your help to improve lives.

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Since its formal inception in 2002, the Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program has become an essential component of the Carol G. Simon Cancer Center, a subsidiary of Morristown Medical Center’s integrative approach to caring for cancer patients. The Jeffrey Frank Wacks Music Therapy Program, one of the longest-running programs of its kind in the country, has demonstrated great success in serving the people of the communities where the program is currently offered. The program’s overarching goal is to facilitate relaxation, decrease anxiety and stress, enhance wellness, improve pain management and provide comfort and support for cancer patients and their caregivers.

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MashupHere’s a smattering of what I’ve been reading lately:

What are you reading these days?

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MashupHere’s a smidgen of the goodness I’ve been reading and watching this week:

What are you filling your brain with currently?

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#BCSM: Like Epinephrine at 2100

by Nursetopia on June 18, 2013

Sure, you might be reading this at any hour of the day, but at my present writing time, I just finished an invigorating discussion with the amazing #BCSM community via Twitter. We specifically discussed nurses’ role in oncology care, and it was lovely to see the diversity of thought and the perspectives on nurses and nursing.

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My. Head. Is. Swimming. I’m dreaming up dreams and thinking about people and ideas and patient care and…The chat ended at 9 PM Central Time, which is 2100 in military time, which is what we use in healthcare, as well, for all the non-clinical Nursetopia readers.

Adrenaline is pumping through my veins. I feel it. I’m invigorated. That’s the power of connection with like-minded people, passionate people, world-changers, dreamers, and doers. It’s like a jolt of epinephrine at 2100.

I think I need a run or something. Thanks, #BCSM!

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Change the Way You View People

by Nursetopia on March 28, 2013

A fabulous colleague shared this Cleveland Clinic video at the beginning of a meeting last week. It’s absolutely worth four minutes of your life.

Change the way you view people today. Then change the way you provide care.

P.S. Bravo to the Cleveland Clinic team on this touching video and telling their story – as well as the stories of others – well.

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